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2006 2024
Presque Rien

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Presque Rien

with Erwan Bouroullec

Led by the acclaimed French designer Erwan Bouroullec, the workshop 'Presque Rien' unfolded as an exploration of design possibilities within the setting of his estate and recently renovated Burgundy farm. The project envisioned an open canvas, encouraging ECAL’s Bachelor Industrial Design students, to diverge from traditional problem-solving.

BELLE RIVIERA X ECAL

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

BELLE RIVIERA X ECAL

with Adrien Rovero

For the member municipalities of GEDERIVIERA, the waste management perimeter of the Vaudois Riviera, students in the BA Industrial Design are envisioning a new public trash can.

USM Design Grant - 6th Edition

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

USM Design Grant - 6th Edition

with Christian Spiess, Fondation USM, Théâtre de Vidy

The USM Design Grant is a study grant launched by the Fondation USM to encourage innovation by rewarding a student’s project. For the 6th edition of the USM Design Grant awarded by the USM Foundation, ECAL Bachelor Industrial Design students, under the guidance of Swiss designer Christian Spiess, were asked to design new outdoor seating for the terrace of the Théâtre de Vidy in Lausanne.

A Third Hand – Creative Applications for Robotics

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

MEDIA & INTERACTION DESIGN

A Third Hand – Creative Applications for Robotics

with Alain Bellet, Andrea Anner, Thibault Brevet, Martin Hertig

Robotic arms have long been a common sight in many industries. They are currently making a rapid entry into art and design studios and practices. Yet, at the same time, difficulties remain in accessing the workflows and work methods demanded by these machines given a clear lack of reference resources suited for this community. The same applies to Art and Design schools, which are increasingly investing in this type of equipment, often without having the resources to run it. This research project uses applied case studies to explore and define a set of exemplary work methods, capable of both informing and inspiring future users.

Robin Luginbühl – Disassembly Lab

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Robin Luginbühl – Disassembly Lab

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

The Disassembly Lab is a conceptual and formal study aimed at creating shoes integrated into a sustainable marketing system. Disassembly extends the life of a shoe, making it repairable, restorable, replaceable and recyclable. The aim is to rethink and redefine the way we build and assemble sneakers. This research takes inspiration from various references and explores several distinct concepts. Each concept evolves over the course of the research process, culminating in three shoes, offering a variety of functional and aesthetic solutions. These shoes, with their TPU soles and 3D knitted uppers, are reduced to the essentials, enabling simple, rapid production and assembly and easy recyclability.

Sam Lombardo – The Table of the Future

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Sam Lombardo – The Table of the Future

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

The Silverground modules are designed to provide an opportunity for senior citizens to exercise their agility and balance in public spaces. These innovative modules are designed to be built into the ground along a walkway. Available to everyone, they are a great way to practice a fun, intergenerational activity. Balance is an essential skill for seniors. It is exercised through physical activity but is often neglected as we age. Professionally supervised physical activities are often costly for the elderly. These urban modules offer a solution accessible to all and help prevent falls – the main cause of accidents among the elderly. Usually, we find that the room in which we cook is separate from the dining room and therefore, when we prepare a meal, we are away from the rest of the family or from our guests. Beneath its ceramic top, this dining table hides an induction system. This means it can be used to prepare table dishes without additional equipment, or simply as a hob. Indeed, who wouldn’t want to cook while looking after the children, work while preparing tea or coffee, cook a dish surrounded by friends, keep dishes warm or be able to cook raclette directly on the table?

Aramis Rüdisühli – Aplo

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Aramis Rüdisühli – Aplo

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

Cycling has become an established means of delivery in recent years. However, although it is evolving to meet growing demand, users are still exposed to the discomforts inherent in bicycles. Aplo, the result of a collaboration with Swiss start-up Shematic for their cargo bike Yakbike, facilitates daily use by integrating optimised protection and storage elements. Aplo also features an additional foldable, lightweight windscreen for use in poor weather conditions. Its construction is tailored to the demands of durability and practicality, while incorporating essential bicycle components.

Sven Odermatt – ColorBath

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Sven Odermatt – ColorBath

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

My project is the fruit of my questioning of the growing automation and robotisation of industry. Do human beings still have a place in this industrialised process or are there stages where their contribution might compete with that of the machines? My project consists of faceted modules made of aluminium sheet. Each of them has been manually dipped in colour baths. The result is surfaces with varying hues, drips and other defects that produce unpredictable, highly expressive results.

Mattia Cook – 1000ppm

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Mattia Cook – 1000ppm

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

Drawing inspiration from the IPCC’s most dire projections and from numerous reports, I envision a future where carbon concentration reaches a staggering 1000 ppm by the end of the century. What will this world look like? To capture this vision, I have designed three distinct objects, each drawing from unique narratives rooted in my hypothetical scenario. Firstly, a low-tech water bottle, ingeniously insulated to withstand the challenges of climatic migration. Secondly, a repair technique specifically designed to mend and waterproof worn-out tennis shoes, embodying resourcefulness in the face of the scarcity of certain resources. Lastly, a nasal device, boas- ting advanced technology capable of filtering and purifying polluted air, serving as a shield against the looming threat of atmospheric contamination.

Marco Renna – LEFT(L)OVER

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Marco Renna – LEFT(L)OVER

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

In precast concrete plants, surplus concrete is prepared to avoid shortages during casting operations. However, this surplus, which represents around one to four tonnes per day, is generally discarded. The plant then produces large blocks, which are transported to a landfill site where they become gravel. LEFT(L)OVER aims is to reuse this surplus to create street furniture. Moulds are supplied to the companies to replace their blocks. This collaboration establishes a mutually beneficial exchange. The moulds fit in perfectly with the factory’s habits and logistics. They consist of two detachable parts with the space required for efficient unloading of the concrete and optimisation of the process.

Annick Persechini – Spirulicious

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Annick Persechini – Spirulicious

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

The Spirulicious project aims to promote quality spirulina produced in Switzerland by offering innovative alternatives for its consumption. Often associated with a food supplement in pill form, like medicine, spirulina is actually a superfood that is rich in protein and iron, offering countless nutritional and environmental benefits. Spirulicious features two snacks: SPIRA, a crunchy bar, and SPIRU, an ice cream. Designed for adults, these products are both vegan and dietetic, offering a tasty way to consume spirulina while maintaining its nutritional qualities. SPIRA is designed to be produced on a small-scale by a local farm, while SPIRU is suitable for larger-scale production.

Bruno Pauli Caldas – Personenwagen 6+2

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Bruno Pauli Caldas – Personenwagen 6+2

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

Personenwagen 6+2 is an electric taxi specifically designed for short trips within urban areas, with an emphasis on local production. It was developed in collaboration with STIMBO, a family-owned business that has been producing electric taxis and commercial vehicles in the Valley of Zermatt since 1980. It is designed as a mobile element of public space, rather than a private commodity. Stripped down to a minimum, the design prioritises simplicity and offers an immersive riding experience for passengers.

Aleksandra Nazarova – Uyut

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Aleksandra Nazarova – Uyut

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

Global energy reserves are on the decline. The challenge of efficiently heating homes, particularly the older and poorly insulated ones, is growing. Hemp, having remarkable attributes such as insulation, air purification, bacterial resistance and CO2 absorption, is a fibre that has been making a steady comeback. Its low water requirement for cultivation adds to its appeal. Uyut modules have hemp fibre pockets that prevent the entry of cold air and the exit of warm air, and vice versa. They create warm, smaller spaces within larger rooms and effectively insulate windows, walls and doors. Their flexibility make them a practical and sustainable solution for energy-efficient homes.

Lirjeta Maxhuni – Gynecare

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Lirjeta Maxhuni – Gynecare

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

GYNECARE is an innovative gynaecological outfit that aims to protect and provide people with greater safety and reduced vulnerability during medical exams. This project responds to a real need by offering a more comfortable and human alternative for people, while improving the quality of gynaecological care. Gynecare could be the first official outfit in the gynaecological field, designed precisely for these examinations. The outfit is made of hemp fabric, which benefits from unique properties, which are ideally suited to the medical field. For the respect and love of our body.

Alexandre Margueron – La Tsemenâ

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Alexandre Margueron – La Tsemenâ

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

Tsemena features urban furniture that allows people to eat cheese fondue in the city of Bulle. The high table includes a stove that operates with a tray of flammable gel. The two accompanying tools help regulate the flame intensity or extinguish it. It is possible to locate them on Google Maps and to replenish the fondue at any time from a cheese vending machine provided by local artisans. The furniture is made of sheet metal and conventional steel and stainless-steel profiles to minimise production costs for the city. It allows both locals and tourists to appropriate and enjoy a portion of public space for the duration of a meal.

Camila Hidalgo – Wood Works Swiss Edition

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Camila Hidalgo – Wood Works Swiss Edition

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

Wood Works Swiss Edition is an investigation into the wood industry and know-how in different parts of the world. In this first issue, the focus is on Switzerland. To explore such a vast universe, the research takes the form of a website, where visitors can browse different way pf working with wood according to categories such as species, region, craft, product, tool and manufacturer. The website features a sample box that provides a glimpse into the intricate expertise and meticulous processes involved in crafting a Swiss wood product.

Hugo Duport – Rails

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Hugo Duport – Rails

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

I met a professional frame artisan who specialises in custom-made frames. During our conversations, she mentioned the lack of innovative designs in the frame options available in her catalogue and the changing preferences of her customers. This inspired me to design new frames. My project involves creating frames with a range of five different styles for various types of frames: wall-mounted, placed on tabletops, or free-standing. What is more, these frames can be combined in different ways, offering exciting possibilities and fresh visual aesthetics. By expanding the range of frame options, my project allows framers to offer a wider selection and provide greater customisation to customers looking for unique frames with a modern design.

Léo Crespin – FOLD

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Léo Crespin – FOLD

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

Fold is a wooden convertible sofa that extends using a flexible hinge made out of fabric. In this way, Fold reduces the amount of hardware required, while still making it functional: simply pull the front part to unfold the cushions, then push it back to return it to its original position.

Inès Aznar – Fragmented bathroom

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Inès Aznar – Fragmented bathroom

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

My project focuses on the exploration of sanitary facilities, specifically their spatial layout, use and form. In the context of refurbishment, my project aims to transform the bathroom into an independent, self-contained unit. This fundamental shift provides the framework for a new typology: the fragmented bathroom.

Noah Watzlawick – Tatable

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Noah Watzlawick – Tatable

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

Tatable is an approach that aims to breathe new life into outdated wooden tables. Instead of being discarded due to their outdated style, these tables are given a new lease of life. We carefully remove the old, stylised legs and replace them with a modern, adjustable and removable Tatable structure. This method allows us to restore the functionality and aesthetic appeal of the tables.

Shania Soares – Alma

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Shania Soares – Alma

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

Alma revolutionises beauty routines for seniors and individuals with arthritis or limited dexterity. Every customer deserves to feel pampered and confident, regardless of their circumstances. The Alma set includes three makeup brushes, a mascara, a lipstick and a makeup palette. The project was designed in collaboration with seniors facing fine motor skill issues, ensuring ease of use.

Léonie Sammons – Vue d’en haut

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Léonie Sammons – Vue d’en haut

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

For my graduation project, I have studied the future of ski resorts in the face of diminishing snow cover. Many low- to medium-altitude resorts have had to close due to global warming. Around 180 resorts in France have closed, leaving the lift pylons abandoned. I propose to transform these pylons into perched accommodation to offer a unique mountain experience and create a new tourist attraction. The perched units, located at a height of 10 meters, will offer exceptional panoramic views of the mountain landscape. Inspired by the traditional architecture of mountain huts, they will combine modern comfort with alpine authenticity, promoting harmony with the surrounding natural environment.

Julie Meyer – Dôme

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Julie Meyer – Dôme

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

Dôme features a series of modular slabs designed to combine greenery with minerality in the creation of public relaxation areas. This project takes an innovative approach to the use of concrete. The round fibre-reinforced concrete slabs, cast in a textile material, offer unique finesse and a unique curved shape. Cast at my father’s fibre-reinforced concrete plant in Aigle, this project draws from my heritage. The use of textile formwork opens up new aesthetic possibilities, while reducing the material waste associated with traditional rigid formwork. What is more, it improves the quality and density of the concrete by allowing the fabric to evacuate water and bubbles, making the concrete and the slabs more durable.

Sam Lombardo – The Table of the Future

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Sam Lombardo – The Table of the Future

by Sam Lombardo

The Silverground modules are designed to provide an opportunity for senior citizens to exercise their agility and balance in public spaces. These innovative modules are designed to be built into the ground along a walkway. Available to everyone, they are a great way to practice a fun, intergenerational activity. Balance is an essential skill for seniors. It is exercised through physical activity but is often neglected as we age. Professionally supervised physical activities are often costly for the elderly. These urban modules offer a solution accessible to all and help prevent falls – the main cause of accidents among the elderly. Usually, we find that the room in which we cook is separate from the dining room and therefore, when we prepare a meal, we are away from the rest of the family or from our guests. Beneath its ceramic top, this dining table hides an induction system. This means it can be used to prepare table dishes without additional equipment, or simply as a hob. Indeed, who wouldn’t want to cook while looking after the children, work while preparing tea or coffee, cook a dish surrounded by friends, keep dishes warm or be able to cook raclette directly on the table?

Nicolas Honegger – Silverground

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Nicolas Honegger – Silverground

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

The Silverground modules are designed to provide an opportunity for senior citizens to exercise their agility and balance in public spaces. These innovative modules are designed to be built into the ground along a walkway. Available to everyone, they are a great way to practice a fun, intergenerational activity. Balance is an essential skill for seniors. It is exercised through physical activity but is often neglected as we age. Professionally supervised physical activities are often costly for the elderly. These urban modules offer a solution accessible to all and help prevent falls – the main cause of accidents among the elderly.

Guillaume Gindrat – Pierre

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Guillaume Gindrat – Pierre

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

In a context of energy crisis and a generalised awareness of the finiteness of available resources, the use of local resources for heating is being taken into consideration. Pierre offers a compact heating alternative. Like its wood, the stove uses locally sourced stones to store the heat. This facilitates transport, while creating a unique composition for each installation.

Antony Gallay – Around the Farm

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Antony Gallay – Around the Farm

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

Around the Farm is a rural accommodation experience. The idea is to create habitable volumes from existing farm constructions. The aim is to promote a change of scenery closer to home for people seeking local tourism. The result is the interior design of a grain silo on two levels. The first floor features a functional room with an entrance area and a shower room. The second is dedicated to the sleeping area, with openings to admire the countryside.

Jade Eymann – Made in Sierra Leone

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Jade Eymann – Made in Sierra Leone

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

In Sierra Leone, traditional handicrafts are in decline due to imports, which have deconstructed the qualitative perception of locally made objects for Western standards. My graduation project consists of organising creative workshops for children in a school located in an economically and geographically vulnerable area. I focused my research on woodworking, tailoring and textile printing. The project comprised two stages: first, collaborating with Sierra Leonean artisans to design objects using local materials and techniques then conducting three workshops to introduce children to manual trades, foster creativity and create usable objects within the school premises.

Sacha Dufour – Airwear

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Sacha Dufour – Airwear

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

When we are on the water, it is essential to ensure our safety by wearing a flotation jacket. However, many people refuse to do so, ignoring risks such as cramps, thermal shock or injury. Yet we do not hesitate to carry a waterproof bag to protect our belongings from the water. It is in this spirit of responsibility that Airwear was born: an inflatable flotation jacket that incorporates a watertight compartment into its design. When you want to take your valuables with you, simply slip on your waterproof bag like a backpack, then inflate the vest via a tube in the front. Your belongings are safe, and so are you.

Charlotte Dubois – Pierrot

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Charlotte Dubois – Pierrot

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

Pierrot is a project that consists of two modules designed to facilitate access to rocky areas and the lake. These rocky spaces were created long ago by humans to protect the shores. They make access to the lake difficult due to their slippery and ever-changing nature. The objective is to enhance these spaces so that the public can enjoy the lake while preserving the few natural areas that border it. These two platforms of different sizes are made of a wooden structure (Douglass) and a metal net filled with stones, which allows them to adapt to the shape of the lake’s rocks and creates an additional habitat for biodiversity.

Alicia Berclaz – Doc Pals

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Alicia Berclaz – Doc Pals

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

Doc Pals is a series of objects that aims to create a less stressful environment for children during their medical exam. It contains a blood pressure monitor, tongue depressors and a set of stamps and a colouring mat for the waiting room. Based on the stories paediatricians tell children to reassure them, a teddy bear monitor, a tiger tongue depressor and “healing” stamps have been designed. A story book, available in the waiting room, has also been created for the children during the exams. It contains a short story and some fun activities to occupy the children during stressful moments. Afterwards, the children can take the book home.

Jessy Bueno – Garde-frais

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Jessy Bueno – Garde-frais

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Christian Spiess, Carolien Niebling

To keep a product fresh, we automatically put it in the refrigerator. However, many foods keep very well (or even better) at room temperature, provided that certain parameters are respected. These parameters, which were once common knowledge, are the basis of my project. The “garde-frais” (cold box) is a new kitchen element. It consists of a pantry in the form of boxes, offering different preservation parameters, along with a small-sized refrigerator and freezer. It is also equipped with a dehydrator, powered by residual heat. With a clear view of quantities and direct involvement, it offers a new perspective on our consumption, bridging ancient knowledge, current energy concerns and future dietary needs.

Wonderbread

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Wonderbread

with Francesca Sarti

Within the Wonderbread workshop led by Francesca Sarti, food designer and founder of Arabeschi di Latte, BA Industrial Design students explored history, traditions, rituals, and recipes related to bread, in order to imagine new unique signature bread.

CIN CIN !

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

CIN CIN !

with Chris Kabel

Within a one-week workshop with Designer Chris Kabel, BA Industrial Design students were asked to develop a glass for a drink of their choice, whether it was for a cocktail, a fresh beer, a classy Negroni, or simply a glass for water to quench their thirst. The final designs reflect the characteristics of the drink or emphasize how the drink is prepared, served, and drunk. All glasses were blown in the ECAL courtyard with the support of the artisans of Swiss glass manufacturer Niesenglass.

Bag It

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Bag It

with Stéphane Halmaï-Voisard

For this project, the 1st year BA Industrial Design students had to design a bag, or a collection of bags.

Inclusive Soft Goods Hardware

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Inclusive Soft Goods Hardware

with Friederike Daumiller

In collaboration with ASA-Handicap mental and the Senior-lab, the Bachelor students, led by designer Friederike Daumiller, present a collection of closing and fastening systems for clothing, bags and wearable accessories that make them easier to use, helping to make them more universal and inclusive.

Soft Power

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Soft Power

with Christophe Guberan

Under the direction of Christophe Guberan, the students used their design talents to rethink an everyday object that consumes more energy than it should, using their powers of observation to choose a type of contemporary object that consumes energy and reduce its dependence on energy during use.

FIGURE LIBRE

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

FIGURE LIBRE

with Elric Petit

Within the project "Figure libre," students are provided with the opportunity to express themselves on a subject of their choosing. The project encourages the incorporation of personal research, or thesis and to select a field aligning with their desired career paths post-studies, be it in furniture, mobility, connected objects, or any other area.

Summer University Finland — ECAL toys with ARTEK

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Summer University Finland — ECAL toys with ARTEK

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Julie Richoz

Teaming up with iconic Finnish furniture company Artek, Bachelor Industrial Design students, under the guidance of designer Julie Richoz, present a collection of playful objects for children made from salvaged b-quality, rejected and half- finished materials and offcuts. Staying true to the spirit of Artek and its founders, the products promote conscious manufacturing and seek to highlight the natural materials that have gone into producing these designs.

Abundance & Scarcity

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Abundance & Scarcity

with Nadine Sterk

When we live in a society with so much abundance yet at the same time so much scarcity, how do we discern the resources around us? How can we look to our surroundings to learn about where things come from, or how we might apply them in our own lives? More importantly, how can we live more harmoniously with nature by respecting it and taking only what we need? Within the workshop held by Nadine Sterk from Atelier NL the BA Industrial Design students were asked to create tableware around the theme ‘Abundance & Scarcity' from vernacular earth collected together in the Sauvabelin woods in Lausanne. Students and crew had no hesitation in getting their hands (and clothes) dirty to knead, turn, form, glaze, and fire ceramic tableware that tells a story.

ECAL x BMC - Daily Mobility

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

ECAL x BMC - Daily Mobility

with Christian Spiess

In collaboration with renowned Swiss bicycle brand BMC, second year Bachelor Industrial Design students, under the guidance of Stéphane Halmaï-Voisard, Head of the programme, and Christian Spiess, Swiss designer and bicycle aficionado, present a collection of handy and colourful accessories for the modern daily bike commute.

Alex Nguyen – Potential Objects

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Alex Nguyen – Potential Objects

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Maddalena Casadei

Potential Objects is a project in the form of a video game/digital tool in virtual reality. The game invites users to a fictional world in which they can move and design objects from a library of elements that can be linked together. In order to have varied results regarding the produced objects, people will be able to integrate pieces designed by previous users when creating a new object.

Nima Kaufmann – Résilience

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Nima Kaufmann – Résilience

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Maddalena Casadei

Used as a set or as independent accessories, the Resilience project brings together the four elements of jewellery. The main part of the research focuses on the clasp, spotlighting an element that represents the only functional aspect of the jewel. This attraction for connector elements results from the work that saw me combine the practices that materialise my daily life: design and jewellery. This story of alloys and connections is also a physical story of contrasts between the cold and resistant properties of the steel that compose it, which are attenuated by the areas intended for gripping the item of jewellery, which are made of technical ceramics. Visual and sensory contrasts thus bear witness to industrial interventions, which are generally foreign to the world of jewellery.

Emma Casella – Newo

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Emma Casella – Newo

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Maddalena Casadei

Newo is a kit for newborns made of Swiss wool. The product is inspired by the Finnish Baby Box, a kit subsidised by the state to help young mothers in need. Through this product, the goal is to enhance the value of Swiss wool, which has been in crisis for several years after the loss of its main customer, the Swiss army. This material needs regular new demand, which could be satisfied if the Swiss Confederation endorsed Newo.

Masen Al-Saghir – Jabal

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Masen Al-Saghir – Jabal

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Maddalena Casadei

Jabal is a collection of plastic-free, repairable and recyclable mountain jackets. It consists of a jacket and a down jacket. The fastening has been redesigned with a fold system, without zips. It also allows the width of the jacket to be adjusted according to the number of layers worn. Jabal is made entirely of durable materials: high-density woven cotton, waxed cords and aluminium fasteners. The seams are heat-sealed with natural adhesive. The down jacket is filled with milkweed, a plant that is as light as feather but twice as insulating. No chemicals or watering are required for its production. The materials can be separated for easy recycling. Resin-impregnated patches are provided to repair snags.

Paul Carluy – Waspy Stoner Couch

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Paul Carluy – Waspy Stoner Couch

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Maddalena Casadei

“I want the most comfortable stoner couch.” Eli asked me to create a stoner couch for his brand ERL. I chose to break down this bulky and all too often opaque object. Layers of covering are added on a tubular steel structure. The sofa is thus superimposed with different textiles, materials and volumes as if it were clothing. In the summer, a single thin layer is sufficient, while in the winter, you put on your puffy jacket. With each new layer, there is a new object. You can go from a Butterfly lounger to an upholstered armchair that you can sink into. The choice of covering can be both functional and stylistic.

Léon Félix – Versatile – Système 01

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Léon Félix – Versatile – Système 01

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Maddalena Casadei

By seeking to respond to the same constraints as my father, a custom furniture manufacturer, I have defined a system and a standardised production logic. Versatile is a modular furniture system that can be adapted for various domestic uses. The project addresses the evolution of the family business and the question of its transmission. It concludes four years of study in industrial design by mixing craft and design, heritage and learning.

Kim Lissy – Pragmatic Gear

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Kim Lissy – Pragmatic Gear

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Maddalena Casadei

Pragmatic Gear is a brand that recovers scraps and end of rolls from various companies in Switzerland. The patterns are designed to be waste-free. I experimented with this by first presenting bags and then, in a second phase, I integrated garments for my degree. Each typology of garment and bag is constructed in the same way but with different textiles, resulting in a variety of falls and uses. The pieces are exclusive and limited in number according to arrivals.

Alexandre Desarzens – Mano

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Alexandre Desarzens – Mano

with Stephane Halmai-Voisard, Maddalena Casadei

Mano is a workbench designed to fit into the cargo area of a cargo bike. By offering a storage space as well as a work surface, it helps transform the bicycle into a mobile workshop. Faced with the various nuisances caused by road traffic, cities are increasingly favouring soft mobility over conventional vehicles. Mano offers an alternative to commercial vehicles, allowing craftspeople to move around the city without hindrance.

Marine Bouvard – Mistral

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Marine Bouvard – Mistral

with Maddalena Casadei, Stephane Halmai-Voisard

Interested by objects as evidence of a specific civilisation and culture, I returned to Provence to identify what characterises my culture and what underlies my identity. Mistral is an ode to the sun, to shadows, to strolling, and to time that lasts. I carried out research around a natural material: the straw. I met a hat-maker who passed on her knowledge and skills to me, and I designed a collection of objects that play with shadows, resulting in the creation of hats that are easy to carry around, so that you can take a bit of the South wherever you go.

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