Alexandre
Desarzens

Projects

Alexandre Desarzens – Mano

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Alexandre Desarzens – Mano

Diploma project by Alexandre Desarzens

Mano is a workbench designed to fit into the cargo area of a cargo bike. By offering a storage space as well as a work surface, it helps transform the bicycle into a mobile workshop. Faced with the various nuisances caused by road traffic, cities are increasingly favouring soft mobility over conventional vehicles. Mano offers an alternative to commercial vehicles, allowing craftspeople to move around the city without hindrance.

Real Facts

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Real Facts

Studio project with Adrien Rovero, Benoît Chastenet de Gery

A collection of neophyte views on current agriculture through the prism of design. Invited by the Musée des Arts Décoratifs et du Design de Bordeaux (madd-bordeaux), second-year Bachelor of Industrial Design students at ECAL, under the guidance of designers Erwan Bouroullec and Adrien Rovero, have given form to their observations and questions about the current agricultural landscape. "Real Facts" is a collection of neophyte points of view on current agriculture, through the prism of design. This project was created at the initiative of Constance Rubini, director of the madd-bordeaux, on the occasion of the exhibition "Paysans designers, un art du vivant" at the Musée des Arts décoratifs et du Design de Bordeaux (madd-bordeaux) presented from 14 July 2021 to 17 January 2022. With the precious support of the Association vaudoise de promotion des métiers de la terre Prométerre, and in the framework of the Summer University programme of the Direction générale de l'enseignement supérieur (DGES) - Canton de Vaud.

ECAL x MEHARI EDEN

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

ECAL x MEHARI EDEN

Studio project with Elric Petit, Victor Jacquard

A series of accessories that will make up the electric Mehari of tomorrow. The 2CV Mehari Club Cassis has developed an electric version of the iconic Citroën car released in 1968: the EDEN. From the outset, this car was intended for summer sports and leisure activities. Today, our renewed interest in outdoor activities combined with electric technology makes this vehicle all the more attractive. With this in mind, the 2nd year Bachelor of Industrial Design students, under the direction of designer Elric Petit, are proposing a series of accessories that will make up the electric Mehari of tomorrow. This project was realized in partnership with the 2CV Mehari Club Cassis, at the initiative of Massilia.design and Nathalie Dewez, with the precious support of Bananatex® and the Hyères Design Parade Festival.

Mobile Fan

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Mobile Fan

Studio project with Christian Spiess, Amandine Gini

Fans with USB power supply for mobile use, for the Swiss brand Stadler Form. Stadler Form is a Swiss company that produces fans, humidifiers, purifiers and other air treatment devices. For this project, the students in 2nd year Bachelor Industrial Design, directed by designer Christian Spiess, had to make a “personal” fan, equipped with a USB power supply for mobile use. They had to think of new scenarios and contexts where a small fan would be useful. They were free to explore different usage scenarios, materials, etc. other than those currently in the Stadler Form catalog. The projects had to meet Stadler Form’s high standards of industrial design, but also challenge and question their existing products. Vidéo ECAL x Stadler Form - Agnes Murmann Vidéo ECAL x Stadler Form - Alex Nguyen Vidéo ECAL x Stadler Form - Stéphane Mischler Vidéo ECAL x Stadler Form - Lucie Herter Vidéo ECAL x Stadler Form - Alexandre Desarzens Vidéo ECAL x Stadler Form - Constance Thiessoz

Home Working

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Home Working

Studio project with Dylan van den Berg, Wieki Somers, Giulia-Amélie Chehab

Projects on the subject of working from home or remote working, which marks our time and leads us to question both what work is, and how and where we work. The recent remote working experience gave us many new insights. This experience could lead to new ways of working in the future, as the COVID19 pandemic amplifies and accelerates. This is a good opportunity to re-evaluate the concept of home office, which started with the emerging computization and technology from the 1950/60s, but has never happened on a global scale like this until now. From the Industrial Revolution until fairly recently, most people worked outside their homes in factories, offices, public buildings or outdoors. Those places and our ways of working in them were designed accordingly. “Home working” or “remote working” marks our time questioning both what is work, and how and where we work. Public and private spaces collapse into one realm with all its social, economical and political consequences. For this project, we wanted to see visionary ideas about where and how we will work in the future and solutions for home working, translated in a surprising/relevant design. This new “home work station” could be a piece of furniture, or an object, or a transforming space.

Step by Step

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Step by Step

Studio project with Elric Petit, Noelani Rutz

The "Step by Step" exercise is organised, as its title indicates, in steps - the first is to design a walking stick and the second is a ladder. What Walking sticks and ladders have in common, is that they have to withstand heavy loads. Nonetheless they can be drawn with great care.

Into the Wild

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Into the Wild

Studio project with Stéphane Halmaï-Voisard, Giulia Amélie Chéhab

Re-design of objects and accessories to practice wild camping or bivouac, realized by the 1st year students in Bachelor Industrial Design.

#Materials #Research #Baskets

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

#Materials #Research #Baskets

Studio project with Christophe Guberan, Victor Jacquard

Proposition of baskets obtained through a series of explorations of the properties and advantages of the different materials addressed, in this case: metals, wood and its substitutes, plastics and textiles. This project was carried out by the 1st year students in the Bachelor of Industrial and Product Design.

Ring My Bell

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Ring My Bell

Studio project with Cédric Duchêne, Stéphane Halmaï-Voisard, Mathieu Rivier, Marion Aeby, Lison Christe

DONG! TRRRRRR! Or maybe even GLING! Or BLING!, MHHHH! And sometimes even BRAOUM! ECAL/University of Art and Design Lausanne presents an offbeat collection of interactive doorbells developed by first-year Bachelor Industrial Design students, under the joint guidance of Stéphane Halmaï-Voisard, Head of Bachelor Industrial Design, and Mathieu Rivier, a Bachelor Media & Interaction Design graduate. Sound and object design are two notions that industrial designers rarely have the opportunity to associate. However, most common objects potentially produce sounds. All you have to do is pull a chair, open and close a drawer or press a switch to generate sound. Common factors: movement, friction and interaction, which allow basic physics processes to create tones. In this perspective, the students offered a fresh and original look at an ordinary object, often invisible, but never discreet: the doorbell. Whether mechanical or electrical, the bells they have invented reveal a unique, sometimes even thundering, sound experience. Here, the classic carillon gives way to a curious metallophone powered by a perforated card reminiscent of traditional mechanical music boxes. The old door knocker is exchanged for a vibrating dong! The familiar buzzer is replaced by an efficient drum roll. The usual bell replaces a strange device that makes a great sound. Finally, the usual ding-dong is swapped for a resounding mhhhhh ! dear to the bovine race, to name but a few of the devices presented. Come in and ring the bell! www.ecal-ringmybell.ch